The Blog

OUTLine wows 2016 Pride Parade

i Apr 1st No Comments by

So baby, call me! OUTLine produced an eye-catching performance all the way through the Pride Parade route, where colourful roller coaster riders squealed their way through the crowd, and when life had its ups and downs, OUTLine was there.

http://www.outline.org.nz/gallery/pride-parade-2016/

2016PrideParadeheader

100% OK TAKES OFF

i Jun 11th No Comments by

On the 12th - 15th June (and open until the 12th July), it’s as simple as wearing a wristband for Aucklanders to show the Rainbow community* that they are 100% OK/TINO PAI with people being themselves 100% of the time. 


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With a growing number of available interviewees and momentum gathering behind the Facebook page100% OK looks to be pulling out all stops this weekend to show just how supportive our country can be.  Wristbands are now available at the following locations: 

Dear Reader, Women’s Book Shop, St Matthews on Sunday, Coco’s Cantina, Queenies and Auckland Council service centres from Manukau to Waiheke and Helensville to Warkworth.

Can you imagine having to worry about what will happen when you visit a clothing store, go on a romantic dinner or have a doctor’s appointment? For many people in the Rainbow community, there is a lot of anxiety caused by having to guess the level of acceptance in these everyday situations.

The 100% OK project aims to help the Rainbow community know that there are many Auckland allies out there – 30,000 in fact!

“It’s an evolution, not a revolution. We’re only asking allies to take small steps.”

Trevor Easton from the 100% OK project and OUTLine

If you’d like to volunteer to help promote the wristbands and stickers

 please contact: [email protected]

A group of our finest has come together to continue to make Auckland the world’s most livable city for our Rainbow community from this June onwards. By helping and encouraging people, businesses and associations to simply say I am 100% OK with the Rainbow community, they hope to help take the guessing away.

Allies of diversity can simply change a profile picture, wear a wristband or display a 100% OK/TINO PAI sticker on their car or shop window to show their support. The wristbands come in sets of 6 colours so that you can share your Rainbow with someone else. All donations received from the wristbands go to OUTLine  a support service for the Rainbow community active since 1972. Show you are TINO PAI by posting a photo on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and simply tag it with #100percentOK – with an aim to reach 30,000 tags by the 12th July 2014.

In 2010, Auckland council staff and people from or working with the Rainbow community gathered to form a group called the Rainbow Door. They recently organized 3 hui across Auckland to create a ‘doorway’ to discussion between the Rainbow community and the new council. At these hui, they tackled the question: what would the world’s most livable city look for the Rainbow community? From the discussions a framework was created and actions recommended – and the 100% OK project was born.

“It can be hard speaking up for anyone, but even one sentence can make the world of difference” Toni Duder from the 100% OK project

   

The 100% OK Project

Aiming for 30,000 allies by the 12th July 2014

If you’d like to know more please visit:  www.facebook.com/100percentOK
Or contact Trevor Easton, General Manager  – OUTLineNZ - 09 281 3409

*Rainbow community is a term that covers the diversity of sexual orientations and gender/sex identities. It is inclusive of, but not exclusive to: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual, Intersex, Takataapui, Whakawahine, Vakasalewalewa, Fakaleiti, Tangata Ira Tane, Tongzhu, Mahu, Palopa, Fa’afafine, Akavaine, Fakafifine, Queer, Questioning, Asexual, Genderqueer, Pansexual and Genderfluid.

For media enquiries contact: Lydia Zanetti at Elephant Publicity 09 368 4180

100% OK TO BE WHO YOU ARE

i May 16th No Comments by


out
 From the 12th - 15th June (and open until the 12th July), it’s as simple as wearing a wristband for Aucklanders to show the  Rainbow community* that they are 100% OK/TINO PAI with people being themselves 100% of the time. 

Can you imagine having to worry about what will happen when you visit a clothing store, go on a romantic dinner or have a doctor’s appointment? For many people in the Rainbow community, there is a lot of anxiety caused by having to guess the level of acceptance in these everyday situations.

The 100% OK project aims to help the Rainbow community know that there are many Auckland allies out there – 30,000 in fact!

“It’s an evolution, not a revolution. We’re only asking allies to take small steps.”

Trevor Easton from the 100% OK project and OUTLine

If you’d like to volunteer to help promote the wristbands and stickers please contact: [email protected]

A group of our finest has come together to continue to make Auckland the world’s most livable city for our Rainbow community from this June onwards. By helping and encouraging people, businesses and associations to simply say I am 100% OK with the Rainbow community, they hope to help take the guessing away.

Allies of diversity can simply change a profile picture, wear a wristband or display a 100% OK/TINO PAI sticker on their car or shop window to show their support. The wristbands come in sets of 6 colours so that you can share your Rainbow with someone else. All donations received from the wristbands go to OUTLine – a support service for the Rainbow community active since 1972. Show you are TINO PAI by posting a photo on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and simply tag it with #100%OK – with an aim to reach 30,000 tags by the 12th July 2014.

In 2010, Auckland council staff and people from or working with the Rainbow community gathered to form a group called the Rainbow Door. They recently organized 3 hui across Auckland to create a ‘doorway’ to discussion between the Rainbow community and the new council. At these hui, they tackled the question: what would the world’s most livable city look for the Rainbow community? From the discussions a framework was created and actions recommended – and the 100% OK project was born.

 “It can be hard speaking up for anyone, but even one sentence can make the world of difference”

Toni Duder from the 100% OK project 

 

The 100% OK Project

Aiming for 30,000 allies by the 12th July 2014

 

If you’d like to know more please visit:  www.facebook.com/100percentOK

Or contact Trevor Easton, General Manager  - OUTLineNZ - 09 281 3409

 

*Rainbow community is a term that covers the diversity of sexual orientations and gender/sex identities. It is inclusive of, but not exclusive to: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual, Intersex, Takataapui, Whakawahine, Vakasalewalewa, Fakaleiti, Tangata Ira Tane, Tongzhu, Mahu, Palopa, Fa’afafine, Akavaine, Fakafifine, Queer, Questioning, Asexual, Genderqueer, Pansexual and Genderfluid. 

For media enquiries contact: Lydia Zanetti at Elephant Publicity 09 368 4180 or 

LGBTIQ + allies team, mixed gender Touch Rugby team

i Apr 30th No Comments by

Chargers ad

 

College football player applauded for coming out

i Apr 2nd No Comments by

College football players are used to being cheered for, but when Mitch Eby’s teammates at Chapman University in Orange, Calif., recently erupted in applause for the junior defensive end, it was entirely unexpected.Why? Eby had just told them he was gay, becoming the latest in a string of athletes to upend the sports world’s macho stereotypes by coming out.“I came up here today to talk to you guys about something that I’ve been dealing with for quite a while,” said Eby, reading from a speech he’d written out beforehand, at a team meeting two weeks ago. “It’s something personal that I’ve always thought I could just bury away, but I can’t.  We live life so worried about how other people view us that we forget about ourselves. I can no longer go on living in fear, repressing myself because of how society may view me. I can no longer lie to my friends, family and teammates.   It’s time I lived life for myself for a change.”“With that being said, I am ready to share with you all that I am gay,” he declared.

In an interview with OutSports, Eby said he struggled with the decision to come out to his team, for fear of making waves or upsetting the dynamic. He conceded to his teammates during the speech that it would be “irrational” to expect that they accept his sexuality right away–all he wanted was their respect.But their reaction took him by surprise.

After Eby finished speaking, his teammates broke out into applause and engulfed him in hugs. One even told Eby he was his “hero.” Weeks later, the team is still showering him with support.“Some of the people I thought would take it the worst have since been the friendliest to me,” Eby said to Out Sports. “More people have said ‘what’s up’ to me in passing and been even friendlier than ever before.”  In February, former Missouri defensive end Michael Sam said he received a similar outpouring of support when he came out to his teammates last summer. If drafted in May, Sam stands to become the first openly gay player in the National Football League.  A month prior to Sam’s public announcement, Conner Mertens became the first active college football player to come out as bisexual.   Eby said he reached out Mertens for guidance when he was considering how to tell his teammates that he was gay.

Out Sports has chronicled approximately two dozen athletes who have chosen to come out publicly this year, pointing to a potential shift in the traditional culture of hyper-masculinity and homophobia that has for so long dominated locker rooms. Off the field, sports fans are also giving gay athletes more reason to be encouraged. According to a recent poll conducted by TargetPoint-GQRR, 79 percent of Americans said they would draft Michael Sam over a straight candidate were Sam the better player.

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Gay Marriage Arrives In Britain

i Mar 30th No Comments by


As Britain’s first same-sex marriages took place at the stroke of midnight on Saturday, the nation has so far avoided plagues, pestilence and winged horsemen of death.

Instead of flooding and the end of days, as former UKIP councillor David Silvester predicted earlier this year, Britain has instead been treated with glorious sunshine as same sex couples were able to wed for the first time.

LOOK: 10 Pictures Of Pure Joy As Equal Marriage Arrives In Britain

Hundreds of people turned out in the early hours of this morning to celebrate the momentous occasion, hailed by campaigners and politicians as a step towards “respect, tolerance and equal worth.”

The gay rights charity Stonewall tweeted emotional images of happy couples celebrating the news.

On Saturday #equalmarriage was trending on social media sites, as thousands took to Twitter to voice their opinion on the law change.

Politicians from the main three parties have also hailed the change in law.

David Cameron said the move sent a message that people were now equal “whether gay or straight” and took to Twitter Saturday to congratulate the newlyweds.

Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg added that “Britain will be a different place” as a result of the law change and spoke of his pride of being part of the reform.

“If our change to the law means a single young man or young woman who wants to come out, but who is scared of what the world will say, now feels safer, stronger, taller – well, for me, getting into coalition government will have been worth it just for that,” he said.

Labour leader Ed Miliband added it was an “incredibly happy time” for couples as well as “an incredibly proud time for our country.”

One of the first couples to take advantage of the law change were married at Islington Town Hall in London just after midnight.

Human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell acted as chief witness at a packed ceremony as Peter McGraith and David Cabreza wed after 17 years together.

Mr Tatchell said the couple and all the others getting married had “made history” and “made Britain a more tolerant, equal place”.

 

Rainbow flags will be hung all over the country to celebrate the occasion, with one flying at the heart of Westminster. The flag – adopted as a symbol of the gay community in 1970s’ San Francisco – was being flown above the Cabinet Office and Scotland Office. Scotland has also legislated to allow same-sex marriages, with the first ceremonies expected to take place later this year.

  • PA
    The rainbow flag, a symbol of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community, flies over the Department of Customs and Excise in central London, to mark the first same sex weddings taking place in Britain.
  • PA
    Actor Andrew Wale and guesthouse owner Neil Allard (left) arrive for their wedding service in the Music Room of the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, as the new law permitting same sex marriage in England and Wales comes into force.

Gay People In Homophobic Regions Die Younger Than Those In Accepting Communities: Study

i Mar 28th No Comments by

Researchers of what’s been deemed as “the first study to look at the consequences of anti-gay prejudice for mortality” have discovered that lesbian, gay and bisexual people living in less open-minded communities have a shorter life expectancy.

The Columbia University study, which was published online in the Social Science & Medicine journal, found that lesbian, gay and bisexual people in communities with high levels of anti-gay prejudice lived an average of 12 years less than their counterparts in more accepting environments.

“Our findings indicate that sexual minorities living in communities with higher levels of prejudice die sooner than sexual minorities living in low-prejudice communities, and that these effects are independent of established risk factors for mortality, including household income, education, gender, ethnicity, and age, as well as the average income and education level of residents in the communities where the respondents lived,” the study’s lead author, Mark Hatzenbuehler, an assistant professor of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, is quoted in a press release as saying.

He added, “In fact, our results for prejudice were comparable to life expectancy differences that have been observed between individuals with and without a high school education.”

The survey examined data over a decade-long period, from 1988 to 2008.

As The Advocate and other publications have pointed out, many of the deaths in the survey were attributed to suicide and cardiovascular diseases in the high-prejudice communities. Meanwhile, LGBT people were also more prone to commit suicide at a younger average age (37.5) than those in more welcoming communities (55.7), while violent deaths were nearly three times more likely in more homophobic areas.

Head here for more information on the study.

Why I want to make films

i Jul 17th No Comments by

I was 15 years old when my father suggested we go to watch Brokeback Mountain together at the local cinema.

I’d already seen the trailer upwards of thirty times, waiting with bated breath for Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal to overcome all inhibition and embrace in drunken surrender. It was my dirty little secret. The sexual frisson between the leading actors made my insides turn to soggy Weet-Bix. It somehow made me feel sick, anxious and elated all at once. It brought clarity to the murky waters of my sexuality – and I felt connected to it, perhaps for the first time.

As a closeted gay teenager this film was a revelation, because, well, I’d never really seen two men kiss before. Not like that – not with passion. In a way, seeing it on screen validated me. I didn’t understand at the time, but in hindsight I’m sure this was my father’s way of letting me know “it’s okay – whoever you are, whoever you like, love, kiss and eventually sleep with – it’s okay.”

That’s the power of film.

Growing up, and even as adults, we rely on stereotypes to make sense of the world. Stereotypes help us comprehend experiences different to our own and people different to us. Stereotypes enable us to assemble a carry-on bag of neatly pressed preconceptions with all we need to be safe and comfortable as we venture into the world.

“The film was a revelation, because I’d never really seen two men kiss before.”

The stereotypes we form are born from what we see. What we see at school or work, what we see at home, what we see at the shopping centre and, though perhaps subconsciously, what we see on screen.

Australian film and television has the unique ability to not only reflect society, past and present, but also lead society and our perceptions of normality. My father recalls in the 1970s when actor Joe Hasham portrayed openly gay lawyer Don Finlayson on the Australian TV showNumber 96. My father remembers how the show brought the topic of homosexuality into the open. He also recalls how for teenage boys the name “Don” quickly became a term of condescension synonymous with “fag”, while for his parents, and many other adults, Don Finlayson became their idea of a gay person, which endured for many years.

Again, stereotypes are born from what we see – and this was both fresh and polarising.

Number 96 was a bold, important step for Australian screen content, and there’s no doubt we’re shuffling in the right direction – but is it enough? More than thirty years later and a brief lesbian kiss on Neighbours still warranted a half-page story in the Sydney Morning Herald. It kind of seems ridiculous, right?

Two of my girlfriends came out after that episode of Neighbours.

Today, if your child were to base their impressionable views of the world on the colourful castmembers of The Block or My Kitchen Rules, they’d be all but oblivious to the very existence of same-sex couples. They’d also think that all Ethnic chefs are bullies and that renovating a house is a fun, richly rewarding experience. Lies! All lies! What about Will & Grace, you say. Sure, we had Will & Grace, and, yes, it was incredible. We also have the delightful couple on Modern Family – and that one guy on that other show. Oh, and yes, there was that lesbian Danish vampire film.

But, more often than not, these shows and films construct a similar picture – characters painted with the ever-broad brush of glorious modern day equality.

“Insert gay/ethnic/minority character here. Wait, pull it back. Don’t make them so real. We don’t want to isolate the audience. Keep it familiar.”

This is where we need to understand and acknowledge the fine line between social representation on screen and the enhancing of stereotypes. Writers, directors and, indeed, audiences, have a responsibility to produce, support and encourage stories that resonate, that reflect and reveal – where we’ve been, where we are, but more importantly, where we’re going.

We need to create new templates rather than dusting off the old and well-worn, focus on the nuanced and bespoke over the mass produced, build with renewable timber, not plastic. Complex characters are molded, not pieced together with expired decade old social archetypes – they need to be setting the foundation to build new ones.

This is why I want to be a filmmaker. To tell stories that only I can tell, to create characters that aren’t perfect, characters that haven’t existed before, characters that, if I’m lucky, someone will connect with when they need it most. After all, that’s the power of film and television. Not simply to entertain – but to connect, educate and, ultimately, broaden our understanding of the world.

This Is What Happens When Russell Brand Interviews Westboro Baptist Church Leaders

i Jul 4th No Comments by

Comedian Russell Brand interviewed leaders from Westboro Baptist Church . . . You won’t believe what happened next!

American Apparel is ringing in LGBT Pride in a very big way

i Jun 23rd No Comments by

o-AMERICAN-APPAREL-TRANSGENDER-570The Los Angeles-based clothing retailer has teamed up with GLAAD for an exclusive line of T-shirts released in commemoration of LGBT Pride Month.Although the company has previously backed gay-relevant causes, the 2013 line is receiving extra praise for including the bisexual and transgender communities. The campaign will also feature a transgender model for the second year in a row, GLAAD officials report.
“LGBT Pride is something we care deeply about, and American Apparel is committed to this issue for the long haul. We hope everyone comes out and joins us at march near them,” Dov Charney, founder and CEO of American Apparel, is quoted by GLAAD as saying.Added GLAAD’s National Spokesperson Wilson Cruz: “By creating this transgender-inclusive t-shirt and tank, American Apparel is showing that they are not only trendsetters in fashion, but also trailblazers for equality for all LGBT people.”American Apparel first began printing their “Legalize Gay” shirt to protest the passing of California’s Prop 8 in 2008 and has since handed out over 50,000 of the shirts at Pride rallies, run protest advertisements nationwide and even partnered with the Human Rights Campaign for their March on Washington. Their Pride 2012 campaign for the popular T-shirt featured transgender model Isis King.Earlier this month, Nike announced it would expand an all-new, LGBT-friendly shoe and clothing line. Jason Collins, who became the first male U.S. athlete in a major professional sport to come out as gay in April, donned a T-shirt from the new “#BeTrue” line in Boston’s LGBT Pride Parade on June 9.